Tuesday, 8 April 2014

Senate enquiry into prevalence of different types of speech, language and communication disorders


Did you know....

the Australian Federal Government is currently running a Senate enquiry into the prevalence of different types of speech, language and communication disorders and speech pathology services in Australia . You can go to this link to read any of 145 public submissions made to the enquiry.  The submission date has closed.

Many are personal stories, others are from advocacy groups, and others from Speech Pathologists and organisations or departments who employ Speech Pathologists.  Speech Pathology Australia has submitted a significant paper. It does comment upon the need for Easy English and includes recommendations for the development of Easy English by government, community and private sectors.

Significantly, many submissions talk about Communication being a Human Right. With this as a basis, access to services appropriate to needs should also be there.  Read more at the UN Convention on the Rights of Person with a Disability, 2006 the Victorian Government Communication Access Policy, 2006 and the article Applying the World Report on Disability to children’s communication, 2013 .


What and who are Speech Pathologists?
Speech pathologists are university educated professionals with specific knowledge and expertise in all areas of speech, language, communication and swallowing. Speech pathologists work with
infants, children, adolescents and adults with communication and/or swallowing disabilities in the
public and private sectors, across health, education, disability, community, mental health, youth
justice and aged care systems.
Speech Pathology Australia (SPA) is the national peak body for speech pathologists in Australia,representing over 6,000 members. 
(Submission to the Senate enquiry into the prevalence of different types of speech, language and communication disorders and speech pathology services in Australia, Speech Pathology Australia, 2014)
 
As the call for submissions has been done via information on the internet, and in complex form, there has been no capacity for people with non-functional literacy to also include their stories or recommendations.

Without Easy English significant percentages of the Australian population are unable to contribute to information flow to and from the government. How do we get this critical information in a form that more people can see, read and consider either submitting briefs or reading about the recommendations.

All projects need to plan for Easy English in their initial phase.  Time needs to be allocated to allow this to be developed appropriately.  People with low literacy also need more time to develop their responses.  Some maybe in written form. but others may use a YouTube or video clip.

Talk to Cathy about how to plan for your critical information and projects to be developed into Easy English.

Cathy 
cathy@accesseasyenglish.com.au
0466 579 855

No comments:

Post a comment